You Can Help Villa Finale Preserve History

Meg and I have been busy bees conducting research on and off site. We’ve enjoyed looking through old photographs and documents in our quest to put together enjoyable and informative exhibits at the Visitor Center, as well as compiling information for our research files.  Late last week we had the idea of soliciting help from you, our wonderful blog readers!  This is what we are looking for:

1)  Former residents who lived in Villa Finale (the Norton -Polk House) while it was still subdivided into apartments.  This would be any time before 1967.

2)  Residents who own old photographs, documents, and or newspapers, as well as objects having to do with the history of the King William neighborhood (pre 1985).

3)  Artwork, including paintings and drawings of the neighborhood and its historic buildings

If you or anyone you know own any of the above, we would love to hear from you.  Your help will assist us in compiling neighborhood information and adding much valued items to our research files.  Thanks everyone!

Back porch of Villa Finale during one of Mr. Mathis's events, ca. 1990

Back porch of Villa Finale during one of Mr. Mathis's events, ca. 1990

–Sylvia Hohenshelt

How Many Museum Professionals Does it Take…..

 

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Chris is perched precariously on the ladder investigating wattage and voltage.

Although I am sure that my life is far more exciting than that of anyone else, I must occasionally reaffirm this notion by partaking in activities such as organizing the plastic grocery bags under my sink or lining the cat pan with clean newspapers, or, bringing the excitement to work by counting and inventorying light bulbs in each of the museum’s lighting devices.  Indeed, the thought of it gives me butterflies: The ladders! The dust! The myriad of moth carcasses in the bottom of fixtures! And we cannot forget the bulbs-or as Mr. Mathis called them, “light globes”.

Just yesterday, Villa Finale’s  Manager of Buildings and Grounds, Chris Roddy, asked me, quite early in the morning, if I had some time to accompany him in the bulb count.  And I said yes.  Armed with a flashlight, a rag, and cotton gloves, we went to work.  We took the ladder around to each room, examined the overhead fixtures and chandeliers first, then looked at free-standing lamps.   We went in the basement, in the tower, on the porches and in the bathrooms.  I had to consider which fixtures might not be aesthetically pleasing with new compact florescent bulbs, and which needed to remain clear or flame-shaped.  We will be able to replace quite a number of the bulbs because there are only a few that are visible from below.  

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The lightbulb from the argand lamp.

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The J. & I. Cox argand lamp.

We counted 207 light bulbs.  Some of them were ridiculously small and unidentifible with regard to wattage, but perfectly suited for the lamp and location in which it was placed.  Like this one in an Argand lamp made by the J. & I.  Cox of New York City.  This type of lamp was patented in 178o and originally fueled by whale oil.  Mr. Mathis’s Argand lamps date from 1810 – and I feel as if he did not want them to have the glow of a modern lamp, therefore he found tiny flame-shaped bulbs to place in these lamps, and several others in the house.  The effect is beautiful and appropriate.